Contrary to every hardcore fitness commercial ever, your body isn’t actually a machine.

When I weighed 300 lbs, I used to spend 45 minutes a day, six days a week lifting weights and running on the treadmill. I should have magically transformed into a bodybuilder — instead, I stayed fat.

After years of biohacking, I know better now. I was overtraining, which stressed my body and caused me to hold onto fat.

It’s true that exercise increases your metabolism, detoxes your body, boosts brain performance, and makes you happier, especially if you’re doing high-intensity interval training (HIIT).

However, it’s possible to reach a point of diminishing returns. Your brain and muscles need recovery time, whether you’re an athlete or just chronically stressed out.

How do you know when it’s time to take a break?

As I write in my new book “Game Changers: What Leaders, Innovators, and Mavericks Do to Win at Life,” a hallmark of successful biohacking is the ability to tap into what your body is telling you and adjust accordingly.

Everyone is equipped with natural onboard sensors, commonly known as “feelings.”

These feelings tell you exactly what you need to know about your sleep quality, stress levels, and overall performance.

If I had paid attention to what my body was telling me years ago, I wouldn’t have wasted so much of my time and energy at the gym.

If you feel sore, tired, and stressed, you could be doing more harm than good by pushing yourself to hit the weights at maximum #beastmode every day.

Keep reading to find out why you should listen to your body’s sensors — and what type of workout you should do to perform at your best in and out of the gym.

DOWNLOAD: Get your free flow chart from the Bulletproof Blog.

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